Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Mushroom Party

버섯전골[beo-seot-jeon-goal]
How many different kinds of mushrooms have you eaten in your life? Both Min and I are mushroom lovers, but when we saw a wide array of mushrooms on display at the Monterey Market a few weeks ago we realized there are so many types of mushroom that we have never known about, let alone taste it. So, we decided to try every single kind of mushrooms sold in the market. The price range varied as widely as from $1 to $20 a pound. We ended up buying about a dozen different kinds of musrooms totaling more than $40. Since there were so many kinds, we left the ones that we normally intake such as shitake, white button, portabella, etc. We bagged each kind in a different bag, and I kind of felt guilty for wasting so many grocery bags. Looking at the long line of mushrooms on the conveyer belt, the cashier asked if we were Chinese. That made me curious whether Chinese buy that much mushroom usually.

Each mushroom is so unique in its appearance, and they look like pale flowers. We took pictures of every single one of them before setting onto a unique dining expereience. One thing we regretted afterwards is that we didn't write down the names of each musroom when we were at the market. We tried to look up online, but the scientific names kind of put me down. If any mushroom experts out there are reading this post, please share your expertise with me.



















With all these mushrooms, we decided to make a mushroom hot pot (or mushroom shabu shabu) so that we can taste each mushroom at a time. To enhance the flavor, I added some beef, vegetables, and udon noodles at the end. As unique as their appearance, not a single mushroom tasted the same as another kind. The differences were rather subtle though. The fun of mushroom hot pot is in noticing this subtle difference in aroma and texture as you eat each mushroom. Yumm..

Ingredients:

all kinds of mushroom
anchovy stock (5 cup)
Korean soy sauce (1 tbl)
sliced beef for shabu shabu (1 lb)
kabocha (1/3, optional)
zuchini (1/2, sliced, optional)
pepper (1/2, sliced, optional)
Korean leek root (3 inch, sliced, optional)
Korean parsely/crown daisy/ssookkat (1/2 bunch)
baby bokchoy (3 heads)
soybean paste (1 tbl)
chili powder (1/2 tbl)


Prepare some vegetables to go with the mushroom hot pot. These are optional.


Leafy vegetables like this baby bokchoy makes a good addition to mushrom hot pot.


Make anchovy stock by boiling approximately 3 large or 5 medium size dry anchovies in 5 cups of water and a table spoon of Korean soy sauce. If you prefer meat-based stock, you can use beef stock. Add beef first.


Once the beef starts cooking, add the vegetables and mushroom into the hot pot. Within five minutes of cooking you should be able to eat mushrooms and beef directly from the hot pot. If it tastes too bland at this time, you can dip in soy sauce.


When you are about halfway through, add soybean paste and chili powder to the hot pot and add udon noodle to experience the full soybean-mushroom hotpot. Enjoy.

13 comments:

essay writers said...

Mushrooms is my favorite food!!

powerplantop said...

That looks really nice!

Yoona said...

Hello!
I just wanted to leave you a comment... I should've earlier!
I've been following your blog for a couple of months now, and I just wanted to say that your blog really saved my life. I'm a college student and thanks to your blog, I'm able to continue eating healthy Korean food instead of the greasy tasteless food here. A lot of techniques that you use to cook is very similar to my mom's and keeps me from missing home too much. Thank you!

Migi said...

@essay writers, @powerplantop, and @yoona, thanks all for stopping by and leaving your comments~ Come back soon for more recipes :D

@yoona, you just reminded me of my freshman year in college when I easily gained the freshmen 15lb from eating all the greasy foods in the Dining Common (I stayed in the dorm)! Oh I miss those days, not my weight though. Enjoy schooling while you can~

Renee said...

This looks really wonderful. My problem is not the cooking but the finding of these wonderful ingredients! Not a lot of Korean suppliers here in Tenn, BUT I will try. Thanks for another delicious idea, perfect for fall!!!

Vliet said...

I made this last night and it was wonderful! Thank you for sharing this. My boyfriend and I loved it :)

tastingkorea said...

Have you thought about submitting your food photos to sites like Koreanfoodgallery.com or Tastespotting.com? I think it would be nice for other readers to learn from your recipes. A recipe index would also be a nice addition to your site. Just some suggestions :)

tastingkorea said...

This blog has been featured on Tasting Korea:) Please check it out.

Linda said...

Dear Migi, I came across your post while googling for 'korean soy sauce'. I have to say I would have done the same thing, if I saw so many wonderful mushrooms! I would love to try this hot pot :)

In your first mushroom pic, the dark ones at the bottom look alot like Michigan morels!

All the best from Massachusetts :)

Renee said...

Migi, where are you? I miss your posts!!!

Migi said...

Hi Renee! It's nice to hear from you. I am still here. I've been just occupied with a few other things since last fall and to my neglect I have even forgot to renew the domain registration for Migi's Kitchen (so I had to change it to KoreanHomeCooking.org instead of .com). Anyways I am planning to update the blog in a couple of weeks. Stay tuned! Thanks for stopping by. Love, Migi

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Silvia said...

What's more beautiful than a shabu shabu dish with a bouquet of vegetables? I'm going to try your version soon.